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TOPIC: cyclothymia

cyclothymia 6 years 7 months ago #50061

  • jasmine
Was diagnosed with cycloythmia in 1998, emotionally unstable personality disorder in 2009, dysthymia in january 2011, asthma in 2001. There is not much information about cylothymia. Does any member of the forum have it, because it really causes havoc for me day to day hour to hour. How do i know that a doctor will know what is is let alone how it affects me. I have never stablised, and in fact have just had a hospital admission because of all the above as i was really depressed and suicidial. Have a cpn who told me to eat lettuce leaves when I could not sleep, have a lot of faith in the mental health system. I was a week within a medical in 2006 for IB but because on high rate care DLA was exempt from PCA. I have no review date for IB and had my DLA renewed before christmas. Beleive it or not am on severe and enduring mental health register too at GP they can;t deal with mental health issues. I feel at wits end at the moment, feel really confused and not well. How do I find out about review date, I have a lot to worry about including a very ill father who is to stand trial in September. Can anyone help

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Re:cyclothymia 6 years 7 months ago #50073

Hi,

If you were exempt then the DWP say that hey intend to assess you for ESA within the next year, but I doubt there is any way of getting a more precise date.

Steve

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Nothing on this board constitutes legal advice - always consult a professional about specific problems

Re:cyclothymia 6 years 7 months ago #50083

  • martha
Cyclothymic disorder is a mild form of bipolar disorder (manic depressive illness) in which a person has mood swings over a period of years that go from mild depression to euphoria and excitement.

Try DSM-IV-TR Online Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of mental disorders for information.

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Re:cyclothymia 6 years 7 months ago #50089

  • originaldave
jasmine wrote:

Was diagnosed with cycloythmia in 1998, emotionally unstable personality disorder in 2009, dysthymia in january 2011, asthma in 2001. There is not much information about cylothymia. Does any member of the forum have it, because it really causes havoc for me day to day hour to hour. How do i know that a doctor will know what is is let alone how it affects me. I have never stablised, and in fact have just had a hospital admission because of all the above as i was really depressed and suicidial. Have a cpn who told me to eat lettuce leaves when I could not sleep, have a lot of faith in the mental health system. I was a week within a medical in 2006 for IB but because on high rate care DLA was exempt from PCA. I have no review date for IB and had my DLA renewed before christmas. Beleive it or not am on severe and enduring mental health register too at GP they can;t deal with mental health issues. I feel at wits end at the moment, feel really confused and not well. How do I find out about review date, I have a lot to worry about including a very ill father who is to stand trial in September. Can anyone help



cylothymia ? I think its a mild form of bi polar which comes and goes, it might be mild but as you say your unstable and that would be because its very hard to get the meds correct, if you had a stable problem they could get you on the right meds ... as this seems to show mild is not always better :(

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Re:cyclothymia 6 years 7 months ago #50092

I have bipolar disorder. Cyclothymia is a bipolar spectrum disorder, generally considered milder because neither the ups nor the downs are more severe than mild, otherwise there would be a diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

However, the rapid and chaotic mood changes can make it a difficult disorder to live with and sometimes it can be very disabling. Many patients (but I don't know what percentage) go on to develop bipolar disorder as their moods become more severe.

BPD can also be hell to live with and is often misunderstood and is traditionally called in mental health circles the "dustbin diagnosis" which I think says it all about how people with it are often treated.

My experience of mental health services and GPs is that they often don't know the everyday aspects of how mental illness affects you. Indeed, I was taken aback when I had a new psychiatrist who started asking me about "activities of daily living". Initially I was stumped, and then realised he wanted to know about the things that really mattered like eating, sleeping, washing, shopping. But he's the only psychiatrist who's ever asked me about such things.

In relation to DLA, this can be dealt with by providing evidence from non-professionals, but with ESA, there seems to be a very heavy reliance on the
Atos assessment except on appeal. The Atos HCP is likely to be a RGN who's been on a four-day course on mental health. They may not even have heard of cyclothymia, let alone how it affects you.

So what I'd recommend is that when the time comes, you read our guides to the new WCA and prepare yourself. You need to make sure you answer questions in a way that takes into account any ignorance of how cyclothymia can affect your ability to do things.

If your condition worsens, you need to make sure your diagnosis and treatment are reviewed, particularly in relation to depression if it becomes severe enough for you to consider harming yourself, both to protect yourself, and also because of its impact on your ESA assessment.

Good luck.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Cyclowife

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Re:cyclothymia 6 years 7 months ago #50106

  • originaldave
Survivor wrote:

I have bipolar disorder. Cyclothymia is a bipolar spectrum disorder, generally considered milder because neither the ups nor the downs are more severe than mild, otherwise there would be a diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

However, the rapid and chaotic mood changes can make it a difficult disorder to live with and sometimes it can be very disabling. Many patients (but I don't know what percentage) go on to develop bipolar disorder as their moods become more severe.

BPD can also be hell to live with and is often misunderstood and is traditionally called in mental health circles the "dustbin diagnosis" which I think says it all about how people with it are often treated.

My experience of mental health services and GPs is that they often don't know the everyday aspects of how mental illness affects you. Indeed, I was taken aback when I had a new psychiatrist who started asking me about "activities of daily living". Initially I was stumped, and then realised he wanted to know about the things that really mattered like eating, sleeping, washing, shopping. But he's the only psychiatrist who's ever asked me about such things.

In relation to DLA, this can be dealt with by providing evidence from non-professionals, but with ESA, there seems to be a very heavy reliance on the
Atos assessment except on appeal. The Atos HCP is likely to be a RGN who's been on a four-day course on mental health. They may not even have heard of cyclothymia, let alone how it affects you.

So what I'd recommend is that when the time comes, you read our guides to the new WCA and prepare yourself. You need to make sure you answer questions in a way that takes into account any ignorance of how cyclothymia can affect your ability to do things.

If your condition worsens, you need to make sure your diagnosis and treatment are reviewed, particularly in relation to depression if it becomes severe enough for you to consider harming yourself, both to protect yourself, and also because of its impact on your ESA assessment.

Good luck.



the percentage that go on to get the other is a wide margin last numbers I saw was 15 to 50% I think that was
from the mayo clinic in US

its bigger problem is being seen as "mild" is many forget to allow for its 15 to 25% self harm risk of all types

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